CYCLONE PRODUCTS

2018 Cyclone Valves Catalog

Backflow Prevention

Backwater sanitary valves are mechanical devices that are designed to allow the flow of water in one direction only – away from your home. Used on a sanitary sewer lateral, they can offer a decrease in risk of sewage backup if installed properly and maintained adequately. Cyclone backwater valves are ideal for water/raw sewage applications thanks to our reliable backflow prevention device, reliable operation and all plastic highly corrosion-resistant construction. Cyclone valve features a full flow design, providing maximum flow for each check valve and positive seal, with minimum back pressure when flow stops. They are also available with socket or threaded end connections.

Ball Check Valves are simple and compact and commonly used on small water or wastewater plumbing. A Ball Check Valve consists of a threaded or flanged body with internal features that guide a rubber-coated ball in and out of the seat as the flow goes forward and reverse. The ball rolls during operation and has a tendency to clean itself. They can be used for both water and wastewater applications  Its construction consists of just three components: body, cover and ball, the check ball is the only moving part. The underlying principle of the ball check valve is just as simple as it is effective. The valve housing has three openings: one for the inflow of fluids, one for the outflow of fluid and another for positioning the ball inside the valve housing which is closed off by a bolted cover. Normally, the rubber-coated ball closes off the inflow opening. The ball is released from its seating when the slightest difference in pressure occurs. As soon as the fluid flows through the valve, the ball slides away from the flow of fluid along both guide rails. The inlet is then completely free. If the fluid pressure drops, the ball then slides back into the valve seating again and closes off the opening completely. This stops the backflow of fluid and prevents any unnecessary damage to pumps. The Cyclone check valve is self cleaning and keeps solids, stringy material, grit, rags, etc. moving without the need for back flushing. The ball rolls clear of the water way providing “full flow” equal to the nominal size. There is no place for stringy material to wrap around; no pockets for sediment to collect; it is basically a non-clog ball check valve.

A sewer backflow preventer can provide relief to long suffering property owners. In many areas of the country, property owners suffer extensive damage from city sewer backwater. This typically occurs when a public drain system surcharges, becomes overburdened, or malfunctions. The typical property owner is unaware of the relatively simple device known as a sewer check valve.
  1. What is a Cyclone backflow preventor?

  2. What areas are prone to damage from sewer backwater?

  3. What is a backwater sanitary valve and how does it work?

  4. How a backwater sanitary valve works

  5. How does one install a Cyclone backwater sanitary valve?

  6. Does a Cyclone backwater sanitary valve guarantee that a backup will not occur?

 1. What is a Cyclone backflow preventor?

For almost all applications a sewer backflow preventor is much simpler than one may think. They are completely mechanical and do not require electricity or any manual oversight. They do sometimes require maintenance a couple of times a year. This ensures the device is not blocked or stuck in place. Installation prices vary depending on the device and the conditions present. But pricing is frequently less than one may expect. Most installations are completed in 1 hour or less.

2. What areas are prone to damage from sewer backwater?

There seems to be two main issues that make property owners exposed to backwater from a city sewer. The first is when the city sewer is a combined sewer system. The second issue is when an area is close to a body of water.

A combined city sewer system

A combined city sewer system is when the city drain system accepts both storm water flow and sanitary water flow. As new development springs up and flash storms occur more frequently, combined sewers trend to backup more frequently. Because properties likewise have their storm and sanitary flow connected to these same sewers, they too suffer form the backwater. Typically if a property has a dedicated sanitary and storm sewer, a city storm sewer backup will not cause damage. Many homes have their rain leader lines connected outside the house. This prevents any exposure to rainwater in the basement. A combined house sewer does not give this same protection.

Being close to bodies of water or a high water table

In many other cases a city sewer is affected by tidal waters or ground water conditions. Though there are numerous other areas fitting into this category.

3. What is a backwater sanitary valve and how does it work?

A backwater sanitary valve is a type of check valve that is designed to only allow flow in one direction. Different backwater sanitary valves work in different ways, but in general, the type of device that is used in sanitary sewer scenarios works like this:

4. How a backwater sanitary valve works

  • The valve is normally in an open position: the “ball” (or “flap/gate”) is open.
  • When a backflow condition occurs, floats under the gate lift it up and start to block the backflow.
  • If the backflow condition increases, the gate/ball closes against a gasket and creates a seal which does not allow water to pass in the backwards direction.

When the backflow condition ends, the gate/ball falls back down due to gravity and returns to the open position to allow normal outflow of sewage from the home’s plumbing system.

5. How does one install a Cyclone backwater sanitary valve?

There are a couple different types of backwater sanitary valves and they are installed in different ways. The location of installation needs to be downstream of all fixtures to offer full protection, in addition to any other manufacturer’s requirements that may exist. Installation of a backflow prevention device is simple, but some times this work is best undertaken by a licensed and qualified plumber, and it may require a Plumbing Permit from the City. Knowing if your foundation drain goes to the sanitary sewer or not is critical, and ideally, it should be redirected. Because there are a number of code requirements pertaining to backwater sanitary valves, a plumbing permit is some times required for installation. A plumbing inspection will allow for confirmation that the contractor has installed it correctly. A note of caution, while contractors are aware of this, they do not always acquire a permit or even inform you that one is required.

6. Does a Cyclone backwater sanitary valve guarantee that a backup will not occur?

NO. Cyclone Valve products offer a lot of protection, There is no guarantee that a sewage backup will not occur because of a number of factors:

  • Installation:  The device needs to be installed correctly, including the location, orientation and position. If the plumber is not diligent in ensuring that the Cyclone’s specifications are followed, the device may not operate correctly. It is therefore worthwhile taking the time to understand the requirements of the device being installed and verify the contractor’s workmanship. Some issues are as follows:
    •  The Main Sewage Valve device must be located downstream of all sanitary fixtures yet upstream of any connection from the foundation drain.
    • Each device has directionality to it, in that it will only work if oriented correctly. Devices therefore usually have clearly illustrated arrows on them.
  • Your foundation drainage complicates things:  If your home’s foundation drainage is collected by a sump and then discharged to the lawn, a backwater sanitary valve has a good chance of being suitable. If your foundation drain is connected to the sanitary sewer, the best scenario is to sever that connection. A connected foundation drain is problematic for two reasons:
    • If the connection is downstream of the backwater sanitary valve, during a backup sewage will not backup into your home, but will backup into the drainage materials around your foundation, including the weeping tile.
    • If the connection is upstream of the backwater sanitary valve, then in all likelihood, when the valve closes during a rainfall event the drainage of groundwater around your home may backup into your basement, since it cannot get away.
  • Maintenance:  Cyclone valves are maintenance-free items. They are mechanical devices in a dirty environment may requiring regular maintenance and cleaning to best ensure they will operate properly during a backflow condition. Cyclone’s recommendations for the type and frequency of maintenance should be followed:

So, your best chance for making a backwater sanitary valve work for you is knowledge – to learn a bit about how it should be installed and verify your contractor or yourself is doing it right (to the best of your ability), make sure your foundation drainage is not tied in to the sanitary lateral, learn how to maintain it and learn the do’s and don’ts of water usage when you have one installed. Most building codes require owners to install a backflow prevention valve to minimize the chance of flooding at properties with drains that meet the specification mentioned above. A backwater valve can be installed in the basement at the exit point from the home or building, or in the sewer lateral outside of the building. The “lateral” is the underground pipe that carries sewage from private property to the city’s sewer main.

 

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